I Might Be A Millennial, That Doesn’t Automatically Make Me A Liberal

Before we begin, here's a little bit about me. I'm the daughter of a Hispanic immigrant. I'm 22 years old, a Virgo, and conservative. I have repeatedly been told by the media that I can't be a feminist and that I'm racist and homophobic. Why? Simply because I'm Christian and I sometimes agree with Trump.

I don't talk much about my political ideas, I couldn't care less who you decide to love, but I don't think open borders is a good solution to the real immigration problem we are faced with. Yet, for some reason, that makes me, a Hispanic first-generation American, racist.

Universal healthcare isn't going to fix a broken healthcare system. But of course, this election, let's focus more on attacking Trump than actually finding solutions that are practical, don't cost billions, and will be effective like, off the top of my head: more transparency about where the money goes and a safety net for those who can't afford healthcare or those with preexisting conditions. My point here, though, has nothing to do with politics itself but more to do with the fact that those who preach tolerance, acceptance, and refused to be defined have defined me.

How did we get to the point where it is automatically assumed that who we vote for determines whether or not we are good people? How is it that just because I'm a millennial, I have to support universal healthcare, forgiving of all student loan debt, and want open borders?

Just as you have the right to your opinion, so do I.

There's this really great thing about the US that I absolutely adore and it's that everyone has a right to their opinion and to speak their mind. What really makes America Great, despite what Trump defends about the wall and such, is that we can actually have healthy debates on issues because our right to freedom of speech is protected.

So next time you hear someone defending the wall, or burning Bernie Sanders, instead of trying to shut them down, maybe ask them why. You'd be surprised at how much some people have thought out their opinions. This strategy goes for the actual racist homophobes that are out there. Ask them why, and then instead of arguing, keep asking them questions. The people who are just spouting populous propaganda quickly run out of reasons to defend their ideas.

Either way, you're both going to end up learning more about the issues than you knew before. Respect is a two-way street. Plus, the more open you are to defending your ideas and discussing them openly, the more likely people are actually going to agree with you on certain points and the better prepared you get at defending them. You might even find you and the die-hard Trump supporter have common ground.

Finally, if you're ever down in Texas, look me up, maybe we can go to a shooting range together.