I don’t want to be with half-woman, he said: Story of a cancer survivor

He was my husband, the father of my twin daughters. He was my best friend until cancer hit me.

I was only 35 when I did my first biopsy. I was a healthy woman, enjoying sports, trying to eat healthy food all the time. Severe exhaustion showed up, but I ignored it. I thought I just needed more vitamins and maybe some rest.

The appearance of one of my breasts changed, and I started panicking. I had a biopsy, and I received a call from my doctor. He asked if someone could come with me. My husband was with me.

The doctor pronounced those words, “You got a breast cancer stage II.” It constantly resounded in my head. I thought of my kids, my husband, my family but didn’t think of myself.

I was devastated, but I had to survive for my family. Ablation for one of my breasts was the only option. Losing a part of my femininity, I didn’t care. I wanted to see my kids growing. I didn’t think twice I had to do it.

My husband helped me every single day. He would work from home, so it was great not to be alone. He and my teens cooked for me, they took care of me, and I felt like a queen.

They showed me love every day and that love and support were precious to me before the surgery.

What do you choose: to be a victim or a cancer survivor?

I don’t want to be with half-woman, he said: Story of a cancer survivor

After this surgery, my husband’s behavior changed. He wasn’t the same loving person; he barely looked at me and started coming home late at night. My husband didn’t bother answering his phone either.

All of a sudden, he had business trips. This man thought I was stupid, but even sick, I was lucid. He had an affair, and I confronted him. We yelled at each other, and he said, “I don’t want to be with a half-woman.”

He added that my scar was disgusted him. There was a big silence in the room. I looked at him with tears in my eyes, and I said that illness was painful and a blessing, and I will survive without him.

It was the end of our conversation and also the end of our marriage.

Breast cancer, you picked a fight with the wrong woman

I don’t want to be with half-woman, he said: Story of a cancer survivor

It can hurt like hell when people leave you in your difficult moments, but the best ones always stay. I didn’t have the time to cry like a baby. He left me, and I still had my two graces, my children.

I promised my girls I will fight this illness, and I became a “Cancer Survivor.” Breast cancer, you messed with the wrong woman for sure.

I always loved the life that God gave to me before and after this illness. Yes, I will live with this scar for the rest of my life, but it’s a reminder that I won. I was the greatest warrior, and I survived.

Don’t forget to have a mammogram

I don’t want to be with half woman he said. Story of a cancer survivor

This is the story of my friend Jess. She wanted to share a message of hope, of strength. She never gave up on herself, on her fight.

To all the women: go for mammogram checkups because the best protection is early detection. Schedule it and show up!