Arthur Smith once said, “The moon puts on an elegant show, different every time in shape, color, and nuance.” I am sure you would agree with him. Most of the time, we see the half-moon, crescent moon, full moon and sometimes, they appear with different colors like Blue, Pink, Red, Yellow or even Orange. Sounds creepy and intriguing right. Let me now tell you that in addition to those colors, there is a black moon.

Compared to the blue moon or blood moon, the black moon is not well known as an astronomical term, but it is a term commonly used to refer to phenomena associated with the new moon. Even though some countries experience the new moon in different months like August and July, it is considered as a black moon due to its proximity to the start or end of the month. In July, we would be having two new moons where the second- black moon would be happening on the 31st. This moon wouldn’t be seen because it would blend with the sky.

The black moon is a powerful new moon that signifies a new phase. The black moon comes with a very strong energy that can be used to prepare shifts in our inner and outer worlds. They are quite energetic and do not usually occur.

Most times, the black moon is hardly paid attention even when they can do a lot especially when you give them your focus and work through them. The black moon gives an overwhelming feeling. Each black moon starts a new cycle which lasts two and a half to three years until the next black moon. So, it is best you use these energies to the fullest when they are available.

However, in some aspects of paganism, particularly to the Wiccans, the black moon is a special time when rituals or spells are considered to be more powerful and effective although, others believe otherwise.

In regards to the black moon, Astro Awakening wrote the following on their website

“Ordinarily, and in general terms, a new moon is a time of fresh starts: the silence from which new beginnings are born. In the darkness of a new moon, we can instinctively sense the stirring of new life and prepare to facilitate its arrival. If we’re anticipating a new start or a process of change in some area of our life, contemplating its development at a new moon can be most productive. Action is not called for at this time, but instead a quiet turning within to contemplate and nurture the roots of our burgeoning creations. These roots may take many forms from material resources to significant relationships; from a well-thought-through plan to faith in a process whose outcome remains unclear. Indeed, we may need all of these and more to prepare for our next step”