Food / Drink

8 Common Wine Myths And Debunking Them

Even people who are paid to taste wine may be affected by this. Some myths about wine are so common that no one ever questions them. People who are set in their ways of thinking find it hard to learn new things.

It's fine to have favorite grapes, winemakers, or places where wine is made. But if you only drink wines you like, you miss out on a huge world of wines you haven't even begun to explore.

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Big Wineries Never Make Good Wines

That is not at all the case. Wines with the quality and uniqueness of those from a boutique winery can be made in a commercial setting by businesses with the money, resources, and people to do so. Even though not everyone can do the job, there are a lot of people who can.

Best Wines Have Corks

Screw Cap-sealed wines age just as well as cork-sealed wines, if not better. In recent years, screw caps have become more common in high-end red wines. Technically, there is no reason why these wines shouldn't age as well as those in corked bottles.

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There Is A Time To Serve Aged Wine

Even wines meant to be stored for years can be drunk immediately. The best wines can keep getting better for up to 10 years. Most wines don't need to be aged for ten years or more before they taste their best. It would be better to drink wine a year early than one day late.

Sweet Wines Shouldn't Be Drunk By Beginners

Some of the best wines in the world are sweet wines. Not only are sweet wines like Sauternes, ice wines, trockenbeerenauslese, and others tasty, but they also age well. People with more refined tastes like them the most.

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Only Red Wines Last Through The Years

White wines can age just as well as red wines, especially vintage Champagne, Sauternes, German Rieslings, and even some dry white wines from the Loire Valley, Australian wines, and southern Spain. The flavor of an older wine's flavor always differs from a younger wine's taste. The story of an old white wine might be just as interesting as that of a new red wine like a Napa Cabernet or Barolo.

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A Bottle Of Wine With A Popped Cork Is Bad

Corks can get hard for several different reasons, and they can also get hard as wine ages. If a stronger tool, like a waiter's corkscrew or a rabbit, is used to take it out, the inner part of the cork may be pulled out. Even if the cork breaks on a young wine, you can still drink it with a little "cork fishing" or straining.

The Best Temperature For Red Wine Is Room Temperature

The media uses this phrase to describe the drink and conversations about the category. The best temperature for serving red wine is between 60 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Red wines with more body should be served at a higher temperature than those with less body.

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It's Very Important To Serve White Wine Very Cold

Even though putting a bottle of white wine in a bucket of ice may help bring out its aroma, it's best to serve it at room temperature. There are many things to think about when deciding how to serve white wine, but one thing that never changes is that wines with fewer bodies should be served at a lower temperature.

The smell of the grapes also contributes to the taste of the wine. For example, Viognier and Chardonnay are almost the same weight, but Viognier has a lot more aroma and can handle a bit more chill than Chardonnay.

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Wine With Sediments Means It Has Gone Bad

A bottle of wine with sediment in it is almost always a deal-breaker. Don't worry if your wine has sediment in it. There are many possible explanations. As young wine ages, crystals of tartrate may form in the bottle. Grapes have tartaric acid, which can build up until tartrate crystals form. Because these crystals only formed after the wine had been at room temperature for a while, they show that the wine wasn't cold-conditioned enough before it was bottled.

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If the bottle is old, the tannins and color pigments in the wine may have clumped together and formed a solid. This is a normal part of the aging process, and red wines at least five years old should have this happen. Don't worry; strain the liquid through cheesecloth or a decanter to eliminate any solids.

Conclusion

Wine is beautiful and something that everyone should experience. But there are a ton of myths that surround it. Please educate yourself on this sophisticated drink so you can indulge in it.

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