Native American Monsters: Top 15 Creatures From The Folklore

Have you ever sat around a campfire, telling ghost stories and watching as shapes danced in flames? With All Hallows Eve fast approaching, these stories of Native American monsters are guaranteed to send shivers down your spine. Best to sleep with the light on after reading these horrifying tales.

1) The Skinwalkers: Navajo Native American Monsters

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

These Native American monsters are most popular with the Navajo in the Southwest United States. They are described as humanoid shape-shifting creatures with orange eyes. They were believed to be powerful medicine men who became corrupted by the use of evil dark magic.

Skinwalkers are often seen prowling the deserts, hunting anything that dares get too close to them. They are powerful immortal creatures that can only be brought to their end by a bullet or knife dipped in white ash. It is considered bad luck to talk about these creatures with non-native people for fear that talking about them makes it more likely they will appear to wreak havoc on their family.

The story of these Native American monsters became popular worldwide in 1996 after a family in Utah had reported strange events and the even stranger mutilations of their livestock.

2) The Wendigo: An Algonquin Native American Monster

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

The Wendigo is the most likely among the best-known and most popular Native American monsters known worldwide. It has been around for centuries, a merciless cannibalistic monster that comes with the snows. Described as a man-like creature of pure evil, The Wendigo is thought to be either a demon who preys on the living or a person being punished for the crimes they committed during life.

According to legend, The Wendigo stalks through the snow-covered forests late at night, searching for human flesh. It is said that it has the ability to mimic any human voice. This is how it can lure unsuspecting victims to their demise. There is no known way to defeat this Native American monster. However, a legend claims a small girl boiled and threw boiling tallow on it, causing it to shrink and be vulnerable.

3) The Thunderbirds: Sioux Native American Monsters

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

This Native American monster is not exactly a beast. It is believed to be a symbol of power and strength that has protected humans for generations. So named because the flapping of its large and mighty wings made sounds like thunder rolling through the skies, with lightning flashing from its all-seeing eyes.

The Thunderbird was thought to live on the peaks of the highest mountain. It is believed to be a large creature, capable of carrying off a whale, with colorful feathers and sharp teeth. Most tribes thought it was the bringer of the summer season, while the great white owl represents the winter season.

4) Lechuza: Yakama Native American Monster

Native American Monsters: Top 15 Creatures From The Folklore

Lechuza is believed to be a race of owl-woman who lives in the nearby caves, hunting the local tribesmen. However, it has a preference for small children. These are among the most dangerous of their kind and considered an omen of death. After a Lechuza dies, her eyes are then used to spawn the lesser owls.

Some tribes believe them to be evil dark arts witches, with the ability to turn themselves into large owls to escape capture. During the day, they walk the Earth as just another human, but the second the sun goes down, they forfeit their souls and become zombie-like creatures looking to feast on human hearts.

5) Two-Face: Sioux Native American Monster

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

This Native American monster gets a thrill from terrorizing local native tribes by torturing and disfiguring those unfortunate to fall into her trap. First, her horrendous looks will render you unable to move from fear or even cause your demise on the spot.

According to legend, this beast has a known preference for small children, female victims, and, more importantly, pregnant women. Two-Face is believed to be a woman who was turned into this horrible beast after trying to seduce the god. of the sun. One of her faces is stunning, the most beautiful woman you've ever seen. The other is something twisted and warped, the very face of nightmares themselves.

6) Pukijinskwes: Wabanaki Native American Monsters

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

This Native American monster rears her ugly head throughout many Wabanaki tales. Her name in English translates to jug-women.

She is believed to steal small children and raise them as her own. Pukijinskwes is thought to be dwarf-like and hideous with the ability to shape-shift into anything she pleases. This is most likely how she lures her victims.

7) Skadegamutc: Mikmaq Native American Monster

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

This Native American monster, whose name translates to ghost-witch, is undead. According to legend, they are born when an evil magic practitioner dies but refuses to stay that way. They are believed to come with the nightfall to curse, kill and even eat any unsuspecting human who crosses their path.

Just like the movies, an evil undead witch of this magnitude can only be killed by fire.

8) Swamp-Woman: Abnaki Native American Monsters

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

Among Native American monsters, Swamp-woman is believed to be a form of a weeping woman. According to legend, they live deep within swampland, and anyone lured into the swamps by her cries will become lost and ultimately killed. There are many renditions of the swamp-woman story. One says she was always a fictional creature made up to scare small children away from the swamps.

Another says she was a more foul, evil creature who lured unsuspecting children to their deaths so she could feast on them. The last is more tragic, as it depicts her as a beautiful woman who died before her time, childless. She calls out to them out of pure and utter loneliness, only to have them taken away from her the moment her hand touches their faces.

9) Chepechcalm: Mikmaq Native American Monster

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

This Native American monster, who is also called the Unicron Serpent in English, is said to lurk in the deepest lakes and rivers. It is believed to be a large man-eating serpent.

According to legend, it has only one horn with bright yellow eyes. Still, there is some controversy over the horn's color, often described as red or yellow with unusually powerful magical abilities.

10) Rolling Head: Cheyenne Native American Monsters

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

These Native American monsters would be a very gruesome sight to behold. Rolling heads are man-eating creatures with long tuffs of wire-like hair that move along the ground in search of their next victim.

According to legend, rolling heads are formed when the victim of an aggressive end returns from the dead to seek revenge on their killer. The only way to stop a Rolling Head is through drowning it, at which time they are believed to transform into giant sturgeon.

11) Deer-Woman: Potawatimi Native American Monster

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

This Native American monster is a nature spirit. They are most often associated with love and fertility. Although she is not a particularly aggressive spirit, some stories show her to be adulterous, leading unsuspecting men to their doom,

In the modern-day, she is seen as more of your everyday boogieman used to scare unruly children or people heading down the wrong path in life. A Deer-Woman is created after a woman is violently raped and/or killed and brought back by another Deer-Woman.

12) Half Way People: Mi'kmaq Native American Monsters

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

These Native American monsters, also known as Sabawaelu, are another type of nature spirit. They are water spirits. Like your everyday mermaid, they have the upper half of a human and the lower half of a fish.

Like their cousins, the mermaids, they have a beautiful song but do not harm those who show them respect while passing through their territory.

13) Baykok: Oijbwe Native American Monsters

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

The Native American monsters are probably some of the more exciting creatures featured on this list. A Baykok is created when a human warrior dies a shameful death.

According to a legend, they are skeletal warriors with glowing red eyes that wear the remains of the clothing they had at the time of their deaths. They can become invisible, shrieking at a high-pitched level to cause fear and chaos. When a mortal is lured to their end, a Baykok will devour only the liver of the unfortunate soul.

The only way to rid oneself of a Baykok is to gather all of its scattered bones and give them a proper send-off, allowing them to cross over into the afterlife and eternal rest.

14) Culloo: Malecite Native American Monster

Top 15 Native American Monsters From Folklore

This Native American monster is a giant bird. According to legend, it was a sizeable man-eating bird of prey capable of carrying away a child in its talons. It flew high over the native lands terrorizing all the local tribes.

When a child misbehaved, Culloo was used in an attempt to scare the child back onto the right path—threatening to swoop down from great heights and carry them away.

15) Qalupalik: Inuit Native American Monster

Native American Monsters: Top 15 Creatures From Folklore

This Native American monster is believed to live deep beneath the ice and prey on small children. Popular in the cold climates of Canada, they are generally described as half-human, half sea monsters with slimy green skin like fish.

They hum a strange calming tune to lure away their unsuspecting victims, to have them come out onto the ice, and then tap the ice to get the child's attention before drowning them and whisking them away to an icy grave.